30 July 2012

Spring - Summer Planting Plan

I've finally managed to sit down and work out the Planting Plan for the coming seasons in the Country Garden.  The last half-year plan that I did was difficult because I was trying to rotate all the beds for the first time.  After that I thought I'd worked out a good system, but because we're about to add three new large beds to the garden, I've had to pretty much start again.  

I've mentioned before that our strategy for this coming season is to have more quantity and less variety. I'm trying to keep the same groups of vegetables in each bed as are planted now where possible, but will make some changes to cater for the change of emphasis from brassicas to fruiting and foliage crops and for the additional space.  As I did this year, the crop rotation will happen in Autumn next year.

I'm sure this Plan will change a bit and be developed further, but here it is for now.  It would be great to hear how other people do their seasonal planning.


12 comments:

  1. I admire your organization. I'm trying to plan my beds and rotate them but my plans tend to change because I'm still learning. Some things grow slowly and they're not ready to pull out when I need to plant my next lot of things. Anyway, maybe I should get serious and put pen to paper like you instead of just imagining them in my head.

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    1. I'm way too forgetful to keep it all in my head!! And I agree that all the planning doesn't help if things are growing slower than expected. It's always a fluid plan for me, but I find it helpful to have an outline to at least guide... and tweak a bit as the season goes on :-)

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  2. I have keep a diary for the last 8 years where I record everything that is planted into which beds, I have 6 raised beds plus the permanent beds for the rhubarb and asparagus.
    Each winter I plant a green manure crop into one of the beds.
    I find recording works well for me as I couldn't possibly remember everything,i can also look back and see which crops have produced well,when I planted the seeds, how long it took for crops to produce etc.I have also found some veggies really don't mind getting nice and close,lettuce,carrots,spring onions,silver beet and leeks.
    Good Luck with your spring/summer plantings !

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    1. Thanks Andrea. That was one of the reasons I started the blog. It seemed easier to write and photograph the progress rather than keeping a diary, which I always forget to update. I'm looking forward to reading back on previous posts once I've been doing it for a bit longer!

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  3. I think I'll start to keep a diary so I don't forget what I have done.
    As I grow our veg in containers and a long skinny garden bed (that also has some roses and a couple of perrenials) I haven't quite worked out a crop rotation system yet. I am focussing more on companion planting.
    I did think the other day that I might take out my flowering plants, but then it is good having other plants as they may attract beneficial insects? Hmmm, not sure.

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    1. Yes I think there are definitely benefits of having flowering plants among your vegies. We have a few, but I keep thinking that I need to plant some more. However I'm starting to think that however much space there is in a vegie garden it's probably never enough!

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  4. I did a vague version of this yesterday but I don't think I've thought it through properly in terms of when the current resident crops will finish so what will probably happen is that I'll just plant things where they fit when they're ready. Interesting that you are going for more quantity less variety - why is that?

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  5. A few reasons: Now that we have extra space there is an opportunity to really start to grow enough of particular vegies to be self sufficient in them; Testing out lots of different things as we did last year was a chance to see what really works, so that we make the most effective use out of the available space; and to be able to be useful for the restaurant kitchen we need to be able to produce decent quantities of the same type of vegetables - we're currently only able to provide limited quantities of things for them. My plan is to still grow different types of each particular vegie (ie several types of potatoes).

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  6. You are very organised to come up with thorough planting plan. I do have planting plan too, but very sketchy.....

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  7. I tend to just plant what I use and hope for the best! There is no method - just madness

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    1. Sounds like a perfectly reasonable strategy! :-)

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  8. the quantity vs variety decision sounds like me too, I would love to grow all the different tomatoes, but best to just stick to one or two that do well. Funny how the garden seemed so big at first and now it fills up so quickly!

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